The Ruffled Crow

Animation, Art, and Other Shiny Things

Welcome Home

Bendy, the dancing demon, stars in this animated musical welcoming Henry home to one hell of a show. I’ve found several music videos featuring Bendy and other characters from the horror/puzzle game Bendy and the Ink Machine, but I like this one the best.

Animation by SquigglyDigg, arrangement and music by Gabe Castro.

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Hungry Zombie

Charmeurs de Verre

ESMA is another college whose students consistently put out high quality and award-winning animations. Based in France and, as of 2018, Montreal, Canada.

This is an allegory of creation, that tenuous connection between muse and man, and the struggle to create. Here, the man and muse keep trying and failing until, finally, one of their creations takes bloom. I’ve felt the disappointment of malformed art that you just can’t shape right no matter how hard you try. I’ve also felt ‘the flow’ – that timeless place where the ideas and words are all there and jump and dance into perfect sentences and fluid stories. This felt like that.

Directed by Julien Baëza, Thaïs Beaussé, Jean-François Loisel, Virgile Moreau, Céline Pantalouf, and Justine Pascal

 

Cat City

Spinnolio

A fun little vignette from the National Film Board of Canada to start the week off.

A modern day Gepetto sends his son into the world to find success…and Spinnolio does just that. I think we all know a Spinnolio at our workplace.

Animated by John Weldon.

 

Wood – The Dead Pirates

The Albatross

 

I’ve been sitting on this short for a while now and have watched it several times – so far. I recognize both the man and the monster, being a sometime writer and also a former swimmer. I’ve been in that boat. I appreciate this short for more than just the fine animation.

Created by Joel Best, Alex Jeremy, and Alex Karonis in their final year of study at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia.

Kung-Fu Crab – Kim Newman

Fabricated

Brett Foxwell takes us on a biologically sleek journey on a quest to evolve. At 18 minutes, it is longer than I usually post here, but this stop-motion film is visually exquisite to my eye and well worth the time.

After biological life has passed from existence, our machines try to restart it with the pieces we have left behind. On an anonymous assembly line, a creature is built from steel and bone and sent off. Making his way through an old world that is dying and a new world struggling to be born, he begins to sense that he may have a part to play in the evolution of his imperfect kind. This film was animated by one person over ten years in four different cities.  via

Clockwork

This little film doesn’t tell a big story, nor have a deep meaning. It’s a vignette in the middle of a workday, of a caretaker caring for their flock, a simple moment where we’ve all played one part or another.

The special bit is the workplace and the characters – beautiful and imaginative.

From the LISAA School of Design in Paris.

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